DNP 825 Topic 5 Discussions GCU

DNP 825 Topic 5 Discussions GCU

DNP 825 Topic 5 Discussions GCU

DNP 825 Topic 5 DQ 1

Analyze the ANA’s definition of the nurse’s role in in ethics and human rights and the role of the DNP in eliminating health disparities.

DNP 825 Topic 5 DQ 2

Provide an evaluation of the current political climate related to health care and define how the DNP can positively impact through policy or advocacy.

ORDER DNP 825 Topic 5 Discussions GCU

Nurse Advocacy: Adopting a Health in All Policies Approach

Abstract

Policy advocacy and committed resources are essential to address social factors that shape population health. In this article, we discuss nurse advocacy to advance public health and health equity through targeted social determinants, particularly on behalf of poor and disadvantaged persons. We discuss components of the right social policies and consider evidence-based policies that have linked improvements in social and economic conditions with increased physical, emotional, and mental health outcomes among poor and disadvantaged social groups. With a partnership perspective, select social determinants of health (SDOH) and mitigating policies focus nurses’ social policy advocacy to improve the health of disadvantaged populations and reduce health inequities. We suggest nurses engage in multisectoral partnerships and adopt a Health in All Policies (HiAP) approach to address social and health needs of concern. The conclusion offers resources and strategies to promote nurse engagement in health policy.

Citation: Williams, S.D., Phillips, J.M., Koyama, K., (September 30, 2018) “Nurse Advocacy: Adopting a Health in All Policies Approach” OJIN: The Online Journal of Issues in Nursing Vol. 23, No. 3, Manuscript 1.

Key Words: Nurse advocacy, social policy, public policy, vulnerable populations, social determinants of health, social disadvantage, economic disadvantage, social justice, health equity, social gradient, multisectoral partnerships, poverty, root cause, population health

Socially and economically disadvantaged populations… are the most affected by public policy and can therefore benefit the most from policies…Socially and economically disadvantaged populations, or colloquially the ‘have-nots’ in our society, are the most affected by public policy and can therefore benefit the most from policies that aim to improve social conditions that impact health (Farrer, Marinetti, Cavaco, & Costongs, 2015). The right public health policies and programs can interrupt the cycle of poverty, disadvantage, and poor health by addressing inadequate social and material resources – often called social determinants of health (SODH). SODH are necessary for better health and longer life. They form the root of the nexus between social injustice, inequalities, poor health, and shorter lives.

Why should nursing as a profession take primary responsibility to advocate for policies to improve social conditions that shape the well-being of poor and disadvantaged populations? Why should nurses concern themselves with conditions of poverty, inequalities, and social justice that reside primarily outside of the healthcare system? Simply, the very foundation of professional nursing is rooted in the fundamental concern for the social, emotional, and physical needs of the poor and disadvantaged in society (Neumann, 2010).

Socially and economically disadvantaged groups are less likely to be in good health, less likely to have access to quality healthcare services, and more likely to die prematurely when compared with socially and economically advantaged (National Center for Health Statistics, 20122016Singh, Siahpush, Azuine & Williams, 2015Singh et al., 2017Woolf et al., 2015). The National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine (NASEM; formerly the Institute of Medicine [IOM]) summarily describe this health disadvantage as ‘Shorter Lives, Poorer Health’ (IOM, 2013).

In almost every society on the globe, the educated, employed, the socially connected, or those who have increased access to material and social resources, experience better health and longer life.In the United States, those who live in poverty, the uninsured, the disabled, and people of color endure most of the health inequities burden (Singh et al., 2017Woolf et al., 2015). In almost every society on the globe, the educated, employed, the socially connected, or those who have increased access to material and social resources, experience better health and longer life (Lowrey, 2014Singh et al., 2017Singh et al., 2015). Furthermore, this health advantage is patterned along a social and economic gradient whereby as one’s status on the social and economic hierarchy increases, health progressively improves (Lowrey, 2014Singh et al., 2015; 2017; Woolf et al., 2015).

The right policies and appropriate interventions can interrupt the cycle of poverty, disadvantage, and poor health (Aron et al., 2015Farrer, Marinetti, Cavaco, & Costongs, 2015Semuels, 20142016). The right policies are those policies that we, as a nation, make as investments to decrease poverty and to prevent precursors of premature disease and death. Evidence-based, effective policies can ensure healthier communities and address the lack of access to social and material resources that form the root of health inequities. Nurses can advocate for the right social policies to promote justice, fairness, and health equity and adequately address SDOH.

Evidence-based, effective policies can ensure healthier communities and address the lack of access to social and material resources that form the root of health inequities.In this article, we discuss nurse advocacy on behalf of SDOH and health equity, particularly on behalf of poor and disadvantaged persons. We discuss components of the right social policies and consider evidence-based policies that have linked improvements in social and economic conditions with increased physical, emotional, and mental health outcomes among poor and disadvantaged social groups.We also highlight select social determinants of health (SDOH) and mitigating policies focus nurses’ social policy advocacy to improve the health of disadvantage populations and reduce health inequities. The conclusion offers resources and strategies to promote nurse engagement in health policy.

Nurse Advocacy to Advance Public Health and Health Equity through Targeted Social Determinants

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